May 11, 2022 Uncategorized

The Most Loved of All Music Hall Characters

The Most Loved of All Music Hall Characters in The 1860s Question

Description

Select four questions (one question each from the four sections below) and explore them in as great a detail as you can (about 400 words each). Remember to situate your response within a larger historical context before you outline specific aspects of the question you wish to address. Make sure to give yourself time to read through all the questions and to identify clearly which questions you are responding to. You have 120 minutes to complete this examination.

SECTION I – PRE-1945 BRITISH POP MUSIC & CULTURE

A) ‘[T]he lion comique […] was the most loved of all music-hall characters in the 1860s and seventies’ (Dagmar Kift): Examine the social and cultural significance of the music hall in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

B) ‘Dancing is one of the spectacular success-stories of inter-war popular leisure’ (John Baxendale): Examine the relationship between dance and popular music in the interwar period.

C) ‘To the BBC […] culture meant that a discerning audience needed to define a common set of values for the rest of the British audience’ (David Simonelli): Examine the role of the BBC as an arbiter of popular culture and taste.

SECTION II – POST-1945 BRITISH POP MUSIC & CULTURE (THE 1950S AND 1960S)

A) ‘[R]ock ’n’ roll seemed to be […] synonymous with working-class hooliganism’ (Gillian Mitchell): Examine the shifting ingredients of success for musicians in Britain in the 1950s and 1960s.

B) ‘British musicians would often adapt American styles to suit their own tastes’ (Gillian Mitchell): Examine key developments in the production, dissemination and consumption of popular music in 1960s Britain.

C) ‘The DJ’s have to be totally involved with the generation they are playing to’ (Tom Lodge): Discuss the social and cultural significance of the counterculture and pirate radio in Britain in the 1960s.

SECTION III – LEGACY OF EMPIRE IN BRITISH POP MUSIC & CULTURE

A) ‘The dancehall deejay’s critiques provided an energetic and politically engaged intellectual discourse’ (Lisa Amanda Palmer): Examine the relationship between music and politics in Caribbean music performed and consumed in post-war Britain.

B) ‘Within Asian neighbourhoods in British cities, bhangra music forms part of the everyday soundscape’ (Andy Bennett): Compare and contrast the cultural significance of bhangra and reggae in post-war Britain.

C) ‘In England, […] Millie’s lollipop was firmly placed in the white tradition’ (Jon Stratton): Compare and contrast two music genres commonly associated with people of Caribbean descent and illustrate their impact on British music and culture.

SECTION IV – BRITISH ROCK AND POP MUSIC & CULTURE (FROM THE 1970S TO THE PRESENT)

A) ‘Northern Soul was not a rebellion, it was a culture of consolation’ (Barry Doyle): Compare and contrast different dance cultures in Britain since the 1970s.

B) ‘It is useful to see songs as a form of participative theatre’ (John Mullen): Examine key elements and changes in the production, dissemination and consumption of music in Britain since the 1970s.

C) ‘Britpop […] became associated […] with the marketing of a chauvinistic and exclusionary ideal of British identity’ (Rhian E. Jones): Compare and contrast the pop music and culture of 1960s Swinging London and 1990s Cool Britannia.8 attachments

Myessaydoer’s team of experts is available 24/7 to assist you in completing such tasks. We assure you of a well written and plagiarism free paper. Place your order at myessaydoer.com by clicking on the ORDER NOW option and get a 20% discount on your first assignment.